Pets by nature are curious creatures. That will, at times, get them into some trouble. It’s important to strike a balance between being able to have all the beautiful plants you would like in your home, garden and landscape and also keeping your pets (and children!) safe.

There is no substitute for providing a safe environment and all of us at America’s Best Flowers want you to do that for your pet and for yourselves. You can use this information to help make informed decisions about what are the right plant choices for you and your family. There are so many gorgeous plants; some which you would never know hold potentially life threatening risks for your pet.

Any plant ingested by your dog or cat may cause some vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, skin irritations or other symptoms of toxicity regardless of whether it is considered “toxic to pets” or not. If your pet does consume a plant or a portion of a plant, it’s important to know what the plant is, how much your pet consumed and how long ago it was that they consumed it. If you suspect your pet has been exposed to a toxic plant or any other poisonous substance, call your veterinarian or get them to an emergency veterinary clinic or hospital immediately!

Below we have provided the contact information for two organizations that specialize in pet poisonings. They can assist in determining if a plant is poisonous or not. Please note that both of these organizations do charge a fee for their service (charged to your credit card), but the cost is worth the potential to save your pet’s life.

Pet Poison Hotline:
http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com
24/7 Animal Poison Control Center
855-764-7661

ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals):
https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control
24 hours a day/365 days a year
(888) 426-4435

This is the contact information for two of Dane County’s emergency veterinary services:

Veterinary Emergency Services
4902 E Broadway Madison
608-222-2455
Veterinary Emergency Services
1612 North High Point Road, Middleton
608-831-1101

You may even want to print this page and put it on your refrigerator to have in case an emergency happens.

As we venture further into fall and the holidays approach, we’d like to specifically mention those plants common during this time of year and other potential toxicity sources of which pet parents should be mindful.

An “X” in this table means the plant is known to be commonly poisonous to that species.

Plant NameDogsCats
Actaea-Baneberry, Doll's Eye, Bugbane, CohoshXX
AlocasiaXX
Aloe XX
Amaryllis speciesXX
American (Canadian) Yew-TaxusXX
American Holly (Ilex)XX
Angel's TrumpetXX
Apples and Crabapples (Malus)XX
Arrowhead Vine (Syngonium)XX
Asparagus FernXX
Autumn Crocus Colchicum autumnaleXX
Azalea, RhododendronXX
Baby's Breath (Gypsophilia)XX
BegoniaXX
Bird of ParadiseXX
Bittersweet (Celastrus scandens)XX
Black WalnutX
Bleeding Hearts-Dicentra, Dutchman's BreechesXX
BloodrootXX
BorageXX
BoxwoodXX
Burning Bush (Euonymus)XX
Buttercup (Ranunculus)XX
Caladium (Elephant Ears)XX
Calla LilyXX
Cardinal Flower (Lobelia)XX
CarnationXX
Castor BeanXX
ChamomileXX
Chinese EvergreenXX
ChivesXX
ChokecherryXX
Chrysanthemum speciesXX
Clematis speciesXX
Coleus speciesXX
Colocasia (Elephant Ears)XX
Cordyline terminalis (Hawaiian Ti)XX
CrotonX
CyclamenXX
Daffodil, NarcissusXX
DahliaXX
DaisyXX
Dianthus, Pinks, Sweet WilliamXX
Dieffenbachia-DumbcaneXX
Draceana species (Corn Stalk Plant, Striped Draceana, Dragon Tree and more)XX
ElderberryX
Eucalyptus speciesXX
FernsX
Flamingo Lily (Anthurium) XX
FlaxX
Fleabane (Erigeron)XX
Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)XX
GardeniaXX
GarlicXX
Geranium speciesXX
GladiolaXX
GrapefruitXX
HopsX
Horsechestnut (Buckeye)XX
Hosta speciesXX
Hyacinth speciesXX
Hydrangea speciesXX
Indian Rubber Plant (Ficus)XX
Iris speciesXX
Ivy-English, Needlepoint, Variegated and Others (Hedera)XX
Jack In The PulpitXX
Jade, Chinese JadeXX
JonquilXX
KalanchoeXX
LantanaXX
Larkspur (Delphinium)XX
LavenderXX
LeekXX
LemonXX
Lemon VerbenaXX
LemongrassXX
Lenten Rose (Hellebore) XX
Lilies of all types- Asiatic, Easter Lily, Daylily, Startgazer Lily, Tiger Lily and moreXX
Lily of the ValleyXX
LimeXX
LocustXX
LovageXX
LupineXX
Macadamia NutX
MarjoramXX
Mayapple (Podophyllum)XX
MilkweedXX
MintXX
MistletoeXX
Morning GloryXX
Moss RoseXX
Mother of MillionsXX
Naked Ladies (Amaryllis)XX
NicotianaXX
OleanderXX
OnionXX
OrangeXX
OreganoXX
Ornamental PepperXX
PaperwhiteXX
ParsleyXX
Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)XX
PeonyXX
Periwinkle (Vinca)XX
Philodendron speciesXX
Plums, Peach, Cherry, Apricot (Prunus)XX
PoinsettiaXX
Pothos, Golden PothosXX
PrimroseXX
PrivetXX
PurslaneXX
RhubarbXX
Sago PalmXX
Shamrock Plant (Oxalis)XX
Snake Plant, Mother-In-Laws Tongue (Sansevieria)XX
St. John's WortXX
Sweet Pea (Lathyrus latifolius)XX
Swiss Cheese Plant (Monstera- Cutleaf Philodendron)XX
Tahitian Bridal Veil (Tradescantia)XX
TarragonXX
Tomato XX
TulipXX
Umbrella Tree (Schefflera)XX
Variegated Wangering Jew (Tradescantia)XX
Weeping Fig (Ficus)XX
WinterberryXX
WisteriaXX
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)XX
YuccaXX

This is by no means an all-inclusive list of everywhere your pet can find trouble. The list of toxic plants is meant only as a guide and is not intended to be used solely for judging whether a plant is toxic or not. Always consult a veterinarian, a pet poison control organization, an emergency veterinary hospital or some other animal professional when it comes to the health and well-being of your pet.

We recommend always erring on the side of caution and while many of us are animal-lovers, we state explicitly that our expertise is in plants only. All data on plant toxicity was taken from the ASPCA and Pet Poison Helpline websites and America’s Best Flowers shall not be held liable for any errors, misrepresentations, omissions or falsehoods. The burden of verification of all toxicity data falls upon the pet parent.