Happy Father’s Day

Newsletter 15 – Tuesday, June 12, 2012

You’ll love your garden … It’s our promise!

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!

Hey Dad, bring the family in this weekend and the Schoep’s ice cream is on the greenhouse.

Perennial of the Week – Coreopsis

We just could not make up our mind on which Coreopsis to pick for our perennial of the week.  It was between the Coreopsis Baby Sun and the Coreopsis Sunray, so, what the heck, we decided to have two perennials of the week.   And, yes, they are both 20 percent off this week!  How cool is that?
 

Coreopsis – Baby Sun

Coreopsis 'Baby Sun'
Coreopsis ‘Baby Sun’

This little sweetie will provide you with a multitude of 2-inch, golden-yellow red-centered daisy flowers from late spring to late summer if deadheaded promptly.  (More information regarding deadheading to follow.)  What a delightful bouquet or an addition to a bouquet this happy little flower would make.  The fast-growing Baby Sun fits in nicely for, borders, containers, and cottage gardens.  They need well-drained, fertile soil in full sun or partial shade.  Watch as the butterflies flutter around the Baby Sun.

Coreopsis – Sunray

Coreopsis 'Sunray'
Coreopsis ‘Sunray’
Click for Larger Image

The ‘Sunray’ coreopsis is another bright and happy perennial that will brighten your garden.  It has double to semi-double yellow flowers that begin blooming in late spring and continue throughout the summer.  What a nice cut flower arrangement this would make for a casual picnic or get together with neighbors.  The Sunray likes full sun or partial shade and fertile, well-drained soil.  Either deadhead regularly or let the birds enjoy the seed heads.  That is a show in itself. 

Deadheading

No, it is not a term from a horror movie and no, we are not talking about fans of Jerry Garcia (the Grateful Dead) Deadheads.  Deadheading is a process that extends the time you can enjoy your flowering annual and/or perennial plants.  By removing the dead flower heads, you can promote more flowering on your plants for the season.

Some people use the term deadhead and others use the term pinch (ouch!)

They are similar in the fact that both processes redirect a plant’s energy.  By deadheading flowers, the energy is detoured from seed production into further flower production.  Soft plants such as petunias, you can deadhead by hand.  Other hardier plants you will need to use a scissors or pruners to deadhead.

If you are unsure of the process, stop in at America’s Best Flowers and we would be happy to demonstrate for you.   

A girl phoned me the other day and said, “Come on over. There’s nobody home.”
I went over. Nobody was home.

Rodney Dangerfield

Annual words from Marty

Brighten any area in an instant!
Brighten any area in an instant!
Click for Larger Image

Need color?  We got it!  Our SunPatiens hanging baskets are in their glory!  America’s Best Flowers has a stunning array of colorful 12” hanging baskets that will brighten up any area.

Miniature Garden Workshop

Saturday, June 16, 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM

By Deb Meyer
Margaret's Miniature World
Margaret’s Miniature World
Click for Larger Image

Think small and inside the pot

If you’re over 50 you probably remember the shocking mini-skirt fad. These days the word mini is applied to cars, as in Mini Coopers, or sports as in mini-golf. If you like to bake, you may have used mini morsels in your cookies or mini muffins. And, if you follow gardening trends, you’re probably well aware of the great popularity of Mini Gardens. Which is why we’re encouraging plant lovers to think small and inside the pot at our Mini Garden Workshop, Saturday, June 16, from 10 – 3 PM. Similar to our container gardening workshops, you may bring in your own pot or purchase one here. The soil and design help is free.

If you haven’t been following the latest gardening trends and are wondering exactly what a Mini Garden is, think for a moment of the most enchanting, picturesque garden you’ve ever encountered. Perhaps there was a path of stepping stones, a wood bridge or arbor that magically accented a host of unique plants. There may have been an old wooden bench to sit on, or a gazing ball reflecting streams of light. Now, imagine scaling down and re-creating that wonderful garden experience and environment in a container you can enjoy in the comfort of your own home or yard.

Whether you plan on enjoying your dream garden indoors, with a collection of small tropicals, or outdoors on your deck or patio with mini evergreens and perennials, our resident mini-garden gurus, will be on deck to help you create the mini garden of your dreams.

Readers Digest – October 2008
A teacher asked her students,
“Why should you never accept candy from strangers?”
One girl knew.
“Because it might be past the sell-by-date.”

Remember

America’s Best Flowers wants you to succeed, so if you have gardening questions send an email to our Operations Manager, Al Lunde, at abflunde@yahoo.com. Al will get back to you promptly. We want to be your go-to-greenhouse for answers.

Bathtime for Lucy

Lucy, our black lab, went to Tabby & Jack’s Pet Grooming last week for a bath and a manicure (okay, let us call it like it is…nail clipping).  We usually bathe her in our bathtub, but during the holiday season last year, we took her to Tabby & Jack’s for a bath.  Wow!  What a difference.  Hubby and I were so impressed with the way she looked (and smelled) that Tabby & Jack’s is now our, I mean, Lucy’s, bath place of choice.  Another bonus is that we will not be wiping black dog fur off all of the bathroom walls for days on end. 

This sort of reminds me of our container workshops.  Bring in your container (dog) pick out your flowers and plant them (bath & stuff), we provide the potting soil (clean dog) and we clean up the mess (no bathroom walls to wipe down).

I went to their website to book her appointment and saw the term teeth scraping (I know, pretty gross sounding, isn’t it?)  I love Lucy, (oh, my, what a catchy term), but I do not brush her teeth.  I called Tabby & Jack’s to get a better taste of what this was all about.  They got right to the canine point about how harmful tartar build up can be for a dog.  Okay, I bit and added that process to her grooming list.  Lucy was in Becky’s very capable and gentle groomer hands for about an hour.  Upon returning, a very shiny, fluffy, manicured, fresh smelling and happy Lucy greeted me.  As Lucy and I were walking to the car, I noticed a man coming toward us smiling.  ‘Nice smile’ he said and I responded, ‘Well, thank you’.  He looked rather embarrassed and responded ‘Ah, I meant your dog’…I’ve gotta look into that teeth scraping. 

`til next week,
    ~ Shirley

Upcoming Events

Sat, Jun 16
Miniature Garden Workshop

10am to 3pm FREE soil and assistance. Create a beautiful container in our potting shed and we’ll clean up the mess. Bring in your own pots or buy one of ours.

Sun, Jun 17
Father’s Day

FREE Schoep’s ice cream for Dad and the family!

Sat, Jun 23
Herbal Bread Sampling

11am – 2pm Sample complimentary herbal breads and herbal dipping oils. FREE recipes.

Sat, Jun 23 – Sat, Jun 30
Herbs are for Grilling

Special mini garden promotion.

Mon, Jun 25 – Sun, Jul 1
Rhythm and Blooms

Beautiful containers available for sale. Special recipes for your 4th of July cookout!

Sat, Jul 7 – Sun, Jul 15
Summer Sale

Our Kitchen

By Bev Wilson

This is a recipe my friend, Bonnie, gave me years ago.  The large amount of blueberries sets this one apart from typical bread puddings.  Made with skim milk and whole wheat bread, it’s a good-for-you way to start the day.  Enjoy!!

Blueberry Breakfast Pudding

  • 2 lg. eggs
  • 1/3 c brown sugar
  • 1 c skim milk
  • 1 t ground cinnamon
  • 1 t grated lemon or orange rind
  • 1 t vanilla extract
  • 6 slices whole wheat bread
  • 3 c fresh or dry-pack frozen blueberries
  • ½ c low fat plain, vanilla, or lemon yogurt
Directions

With a fork, beat eggs and brown sugar together in a large bowl until well blended.  Stir in milk, cinnamon, lemon rind, and vanilla.  Cut or tear bread into ½ inch pieces and stir into the mixture.  Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour or overnight.  Preheat oven to 375.  Lightly coat an 8×8 baking pan with cooking spray.  Stir the berries into mixture and spoon into the pan, uncovered, spreading the pudding evenly. Bake 40 minutes or until firm and golden.  Serve warm, topping each portion with 2T yogurt, if desired.  Serves 6

For a beautiful breakfast, serve this colorful pudding with fresh strawberries on the side and a slice of cantaloupe.  YUM!


On the subject of bread puddings – I found this recipe when browsing the net.  It sounds too good for words, and as far from healthy as we are likely to get.  I have not tried it, I cannot – I’m sure I would eat the whole thing.  If you have an occasion to prepare pure decadence, let me know how it turns out.

Chocolate Almond Croissant Bread Pudding

As decadent as it gets!! Serves 8- 12
  • 6 TRADER JOE’S Almond Croissants (20 Ounces), cubed
  • 6-8 ounces fine dark chocolate, chpd (up to twice the size of choc chips)
  • ¾ C toasted almonds, roughly chopped
  • 4 ounces Almond Paste, chopped- optional
  • ½ – ¾ C TRADER JOE’S Dried Tart Montmorency Cherries
  • 6 lg eggs
  • 2 lg egg yolks
  • 1 C sugar
  • 1 ½ C heavy cream
  • 2 2/3 C whole milk
  • ¼ – ½ C brandy
  • 2 t vanilla
  • ½ t kosher salt
  • 2-4 T cold unsalted butter, chopped
Directions

Cube croissants, spread out on sheet pan and air dry for a day or toast lightly in 250 degree oven ½- 1 hr. Spread evenly in a buttered or Pam’d 9 x 12” non-metallic baking dish.  Distribute almonds, chocolate, almond paste and cherries in the pan, tucking in around the cubes.

Whisk egg yolks and eggs until combined, add liquids, sugar and salt. Pour over the dish, pushing down on the croissant mixture to submerge in the liquid.  Dot with butter.  Chill at least 1 hr or up to 24 hrs.

Bake at 350 degrees, 40 minutes until lightly browned and custard is set.  Cut and serve as is or napped with vanilla crème anglaise.  (If anyone knows what that means, let me know, this farm girl would probably just pour a bit of cream on it)

Readers Digest – October 2008
A colleague at my office was excited about the English literature class he was taking at night school.
“We’re reading Shakespeare,” he said.
“Great,” I replied, “Which one?”
“William.”

SEE YOU SOON!!!
Carol and Ed Knapton, owners of Americas's Best Flowers You’ll Love Your Garden … It’s Our Promise! May the Holy Spirit Guide You! God Bless
Edward Knapton says Keep on Smiling!
Sec – Treasurer Berry Hill Farms, Inc.
DBA Americas Best Flowers Garden Center
4311 Vilas Hope Road
Cottage Grove, WI 53527
608-222-2269 Fax 608-222-1234 Cell 608-698-5627